Business And Employment Immigration Lawyer

HELPING TO BRING BUSINESSES AND WORKERS TOGETHER

Those who wish to travel or relocate to the United States for work must petition for that right. Living in the U.S. is not feasible if you cannot work. Fortunately, the U.S. offers several different temporary work visas for individuals who would like to come to the country and work for a fixed period of time. The duration of the visa depends on the type of work you are coming to perform and your country of origin.

An experienced Florida business and employment immigration lawyer at the Bassey Immigration Law Center can help you obtain a temporary work visa. We also assist employers in filling out the forms needed to secure workers. The employment immigration process can be complex, and when your right to enter and work is on the line, there is every reason to get it right the first time. Please call our offices today to schedule an appointment with an experienced business and investment visa attorney, or use the website contact form and we will get back to you as soon as possible.

OBTAINING TEMPORARY WORK VISAS OR IMMIGRANT BUSINESS VISAS

If you wish to work in the United States, your future employer will need to complete an I-129 form and file it with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). The form requires that your employer specify the type of work visa sought. We can help employers and immigrants with the I-129 form along with applications for numerous temporary work visas, including those below.

TYPES OF BUSINESS, INVESTMENT, AND EMPLOYMENT VISAS

Temporary Visit for Business

Intended only for short-term business-related visits, these visas include:

  • B-1 visas for business visitors to stay for a set time period
  • GB and WB visas, which grant limited visits to nationals of specific countries

Temporary Non-Immigrant

These allow people to work in the U.S. for a fixed period of time. An employer usually files the petition and the employee and his or her family members need to apply for visas before arriving in the U.S. Common types include:

  • H visas for workers of specific professionals or academic fields
  • I visas for certain members of foreign press
  • L visas for individuals who are temporarily transferring within a company at which they are already employed
  • O visas for individuals with extraordinary or exceptional ability
  • P visas for athletes, artists, or entertainers (usually granted for specific events)
  • R visas for religious workers engaged in work for a denomination or associated non-profit
  • TN visas for Canadian and Mexican NAFTA workers

Speak with a family green cards and visas attorney to ensure you follow the correct process to bring your spouse and children into the country.

Permanent Immigrant Workers

Entrepreneurs and workers with desirable skills and their spouses and children may apply for the 140,000 green cards available each year. The five types are based on categories of skill that the applicant brings and include:

  • EB-1 for priority workers and those with “extraordinary ability”
  • EB-2 for professionals with advanced degrees and those with “exceptional ability”
  • EB-3 for skilled workers, professionals, and certain unskilled workers
  • EB-4 for certain special immigrants, including broadcasters, ministers of religion, and Iraqi translators
  • EB-5 for immigrant investors

Specific visas may include:

  • E-2 Visa:Treaty Investor Visas
  • E-1 Visa: Treaty Trader Visas
  • L-1A: Intracompany Transferee for Executives or Managers
  • L-1B: Intracompany Transferee for Workers with Specialized Knowledge
  • R1 Visa: Religious Worker
  • R2 Visa: Spouse and Unmarried Child under 21 of an R1 Visa Holder
  • H-1B Visas:Skilled foreign workers
  • H-2A Visas: Temporary Agricultural Workers
  • H-2B Visas: Temporary Non-Agricultural Workers
  • E-3: Visas for Australian Professionals
  • EB-1A: Extraordinary Ability
  • EB-1B: Outstanding Researchers
  • EB-1C: Multinational Managers and Executives
  • EB-2: National Interest Waiver

Selecting the appropriate visa can be a challenge, but we can help determine your occupational category and whether you meet the eligibility requirements. Keep in mind that most of these visas are temporary and not necessarily an avenue for permanent relocation to the United States. If you hope to become a U.S. citizen or legal permanent resident, you must speak with an experienced Florida immigration attorney for help in pursuing your best course of action.

PAYING FOR BUSINESS IMMIGRATION TO THE U.S.

Immigrating to the United States can be costly. However, because temporary work visas require sponsorship from a U.S.-based company, most employers will shoulder the expense of the application process. At the Bassey Immigration Law Center, we believe in providing high-quality immigration services at an affordable cost, regardless of who is responsible for the financial burden. In fact, our business immigration lawyers may be able to handle your temporary work visa application on a flat fee basis, allowing both you and your employer to easily budget for the entire application process.

KNOWLEDGEABLE GUIDANCE FROM A FLORIDA BUSINESS IMMIGRATION ATTORNEY

If you do not meet one or more of the requirements to enter or remain in the United States, you may be eligible for a waiver. Some waivers are automatic, but others require an application. Speak with a qualified attorney about Florida immigration waivers to discuss your options.

Business immigration can often be a challenge. At the Bassey Immigration Law Center, P.A., we have the knowledge and skill to help individuals, their spouses and children, and their employers throughout the application process. Speak with a skilled business and family immigration lawyer in Florida by calling our Tampa office at 813-592-3943 or our Clearwater office at 727-408-5170, or by contacting us online.