Immigrants are part of the United States’ foundation. Florida welcomes fortune seekers, adventurers and the persecuted. The country as a whole is a haven for those who wish religious and political freedom; it is also a sanctuary for a broad array of cultural and ethnic groups. We often represent clients prohibited by law from entering or remaining in the United States. 

According to the Office of the Law Revision Counsel of the United States House of Representatives, although people from around the globe can immigrate to America, there are several grounds of inadmissibility that may prevent you from coming into or staying in the country. 

Criminal and related grounds 

You may be inadmissible to the U.S. if you admit to committing or have a convicted of particular offenses on your record. Crimes involving moral turpitude encompass deceit or fraud and those categorized as depraved, base or vile. CIMT examples include arson, murder, rape, theft and murder. 

If an immigration officer has reason to believe or knows that you are guilty of a drug-related offense, including trafficking, it can make you inadmissible. The same is true for human trafficking, prostitution and money laundering. A conviction record is not necessary for declaring you ineligible for a green card or visa. 

Aliens previously removed 

If you received deportation orders and left the country, you are inadmissible. However, depending on the reason for your removal, it may not be for life. For individuals in the U.S. unlawfully for more than 180 days and less than a year, they are inadmissible for three years. Those who reside here illegally for more than a year are inadmissible for ten years. 

There are also several security and health-related grounds that can cause inadmissibility. Depending on the reason, there may be exceptions and waivers available. Visit our webpage for more information on this topic. 

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