When you arrived in Florida from your native country, you likely had certain dreams or goals that you hoped to accomplish. Perhaps you were marrying the love of your life and were eager to set down roots and start a family here. Maybe your ultimate goal was to become a full-fledged U.S. citizen. If, at some point, during your navigation of the process, you have been called to an immigration interview, you might be feeling a bit nervous.

There are numerous reasons why you might receive a notice to appear at an immigration interview. If you have a language barrier, you might feel confused about some of the questions and worry that your translation might not be correct. There are several things to keep in mind to help you prepare for your interview and to help you avoid stress or legal problems as well.

Documentation is important for successful immigration interviews

If you walk into an interview room with no paperwork in hand, it would not be surprising if legal complications arise. The specific documents that are required depend on your particular case as well as the reasons officials wish to conduct the interview. It’s a good idea to speak to someone ahead of time who well-versed in immigration law issues. Doing so may help you avoid problems, especially if you’re unsure whether you need to bring a certain document.

You will no doubt need to take your birth certificate and passport. If you have been married or divorced, legal documents pertaining to these issues may also be required. Additional documentation that may be important to your case might include police reports, medical records or tax information. If you are of legal adult age, officials will also likely take your fingerprints when you enter the interview facility.

Waiting for answers after an immigration interview

Perhaps, you’re applying for a visa or green card. Maybe immigration officials are questioning the legitimacy of your marriage. No matter what the specific reason is for your interview, once you navigate the process, you will be waiting for results. It may take as long as two weeks before you get them. Then again, immigration officers might refuse your visa on the same day as your interview. This might happen if you showed up without proper documentation.

In certain cases, it might take as long as 60 days for your case to be fully processed. It is important to know where to seek support to receive updates on your case and to obtain assistance if a legal complication arises that places your status at risk.

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